Antipodean Antinuclearism

The Antipodean Antinuclearism book project consists of a major three volume study into the problem of nuclear harm in various stages of development. Characteristic of the emerging subfield of the Nuclear Humanities, the three volumes explore the philosophical, cultural and political aspects, respectively. To date, the project highlights include one sole-authored manuscript under advanced contract as well as more than a dozen delivered papers, book chapters and articles:

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Volume I:
Antipodean Nuclear Philosophy [2011-19]

When inaugurating the subfield of Environmental Philosophy in 1973, Richard Routley located the seed of Western anthropocentrism in the liberal harm principle. Yet, beginning in the late-1990s, Andrew Linklater began globalising the harm principle with no reference to Routley, or to debates in Environmental Philosophy about the moral status of the non-human world. I contend that since nuclear harms and our responses to them are fundamentally ecological, a thoroughgoing reappraisal of Routley and Linklater’s ethics is needed. What emerges is a new, multi-centred, nuclear ethical theory that takes as its subject both humanity and the biosphere. This is because: (1) nuclear harms violate not only the human body but also the global biosphere on which all life depends; (2) nuclear harms occur on spatial and temporal scales that mutually implicate humanity and Earth’s zones of life; and (3) re-imagining nuclear harm prohibitions in ecological terms demonstrates that this new, multi-centred, nuclear ethics is both realistic and realizable.

Role: principal investigator and sole-author
Status: in draft [2011-19]
Activities: 2x articles, 4x delivered papers, 1x review, 2x convened panels and 1x blog
Sponsor/s: Australian Federal Government and the University of Queensland

The manuscript Antipodean Nuclear Philosophy is yet to be sent for peer review and therefore remains unsigned, although a preliminary proposal has interested several contemporary culture presses. To date, the following published outputs have arisen from this phase of the project:

  1. N.A.J. Taylor, ‘The problem of nuclear harm for Andrew Linklater, Lorraine Elliott, and other contemporary cosmopolitans’, Global Society, Vol.32 Is.1, 2018, 111-126. [PDF]
  2. N.A.J. Taylor, ‘Earth ethics on nuclear time’. Paper presented at the 2nd Peaceful Coexistence Colloquium: Reimagining the Politics and Ethics of Space for the Anthropocene, University of Lapland, Pyhätunturi, Finland, June 6-9, 2017. [PDF available on request]
  3. N.A.J. Taylor, ‘Anthropocosmic thinking on the problem of nuclear harm: A reply to Seth D. Clippard, and a plea to Mary Evelyn Tucker and Tu Weiming’, Journal for the Study of Religion, Nature and Culture, Vol.10 No.1, March 2016, pp.58-65. [PDF]
  4. N.A.J. Taylor, ‘On the possibility of an Arendtian nuclear theory’, Hannah Arendt Center for Politics and Humanities, January 31, 2016. [LINK]
  5. Nuclear Ethics after Nye: Perspectives from Politics and Philosophy, 57th International Studies Association Annual Convention, Atlanta, Georgia, United States, March 18, 2016. Co-convenor with Thomas E. Doyle II.
  6. N.A.J. Taylor, ‘Nuclear ethics as ecological ethics’. Paper presented at the British International Studies Association Annual Conference, London, England, June 18, 2015. [PDF available on request]
  7. Nuclear Ethics after Nye: Perspectives from Politics and Philosophy, British International Studies Association (BISA) Annual Conference, London: England, June 16-19, 2015Sponsored by the BISA Working Group on Global Nuclear Order. Co-convenor and chair with Thomas E. Doyle II.
  8. N.A.J. Taylor, ‘Rethinking cosmopolitan solidarity: Nuclear harm from a cosmic point of view’. Paper presented at the British International Studies Association Working Group on Global Nuclear Order: Global Challenges in a Nuclear-Armed World, University of Bristol, England, September 2, 2014. [PDF available on request]
  9. N.A.J. Taylor, ‘Rethinking cosmopolitan solidarity: Nuclear harm from a cosmic point of view’. Paper presented at the International Society for Environmental Ethics and International Association for Environmental Philosophy 11th Meeting on Environmental Philosophy, Allenspark, Colorado, U.S., June 20, 2014. [PDF available on request]
  10. N.A.J. Taylor, Review of Andrew Linklater’s The Problem of Harm in World Politics: Theoretical Investigations (Cambridge University Press, 2011)’. For Australian Book Review, No.342, June 2012. [PDF]

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Volume II:
Antipodean Nuclear Cultures [2011-20]

Despite the intuition that artistic responses may offer important insights into the problem of nuclear harm, there have been relatively few works that could be said to constitute a scholarly literature of nuclear art in Oceania. Indeed, a review of the related and larger literature which does exist on cultural responses to American, British, and French nuclear colonialism similarly offers little guidance. The task therefore remains to remedy the relative neglect of Oceania in the literature on nuclear art and culture. For this I examine the artistic response to the emergence of nuclear harms across the three main Oceanic regions: Polynesia, Melanesia and Micronesia.

Role: principal investigator and sole-author
Status:
 in draft [2011-20]
Activities: 1x article and 4x delivered papers
Sponsor/s: Australian Council of the Arts, Alphaville, and the University of Montréal

The manuscript Antipodean Nuclear Cultures is yet to be sent for peer review and therefore remains unsigned, although a preliminary proposal has interested several contemporary culture presses. To date, the following published outputs have arisen from this phase of the project:

  1. N.A.J. Taylor, ‘Situated nuclear knowledges: An ecology of Antipodean nuclear art’, Unlikely: Journal for Creative Arts, Is. 4, 2018. [PDF available on request]
  2. N.A.J. Taylor, ‘Dystopia and utopia in the Australian nuclear imaginary’. Paper presented at the Dystopic Futures and Utopian Possibilities workshop, Swinburne University and Hawthorn Arts Centre, May 5, 2018. [PDF available on request]
  3. N.A.J. Taylor, ‘An ecology of Antipodean nuclear art’. Departmental seminar at the Cultural Enquiry Research Group (CERG) Seminar Series, Federation University, Ballarat, Australia, July 3, 2017. [PDF available on request]
  4. N.A.J. Taylor, ‘An ecology of Antipodean nuclear art’. Keynote lecture sponsored by the Department of Art History and Film Studies and the Department of Literatures and Languages of the World, University of Montréal, Montréal, Canada, March 11, 2017. [PDF available on request]
  5. N.A.J. Taylor, ‘After Shock—A post-Fukushima Artist’s Talk’. Panel discussion at the Asia-Pacific Triennial of Performing Arts (TOPA), Arts House, North Melbourne Town Hall, Melbourne, VIC, Australia, February 12, 2017. [PDF available on request]

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Volume III:
Antipodean Nuclear Politics [2011-21]

The clear majority of the nuclear literature was written from either a superpower or else Eurocentric perspective. Although an Antipodean stance-by which I mean perspectives from Australia, New Zealand and Oceania-should have no bearing on the morality of the matter, in this manuscript I make the case that such Antipodean perspectives on the nuclear age are highly politically relevant. This is achieved by performing a survey of the unique insights and perspectives that the nuclear politics and people of Australia, New Zealand, Polynesia, Micronesia and Melanesia. A small number of individuals stand out: the environmental philosophers Richard Routley/Sylvan and Val Routley/Plumwood of Australia, the politician and eco-feminist Marilyn Waring of New Zealand, the Marshallese activist and poet Darlene Keju-Johnson, the Fijian feminists Suliana Siwatibau and Amelia Rokotuivuna, the European couple Bengt and Marie-Thérèse Danielsson on Tahiti, among others. In so doing, another narrative emerges in which the region’s minorities—including indigenous peoples, artists, and women—are rightly viewed as critical not only to Antipodean nuclear thinking, but also its politics, culminating with the 1985 Rarotonga Treaty which established the South Pacific nuclear-weapon-free zone. Much neglected in nuclear scholarship, Antipodean Nuclear Politics serves as both a corrective and alternative to the Anglo-American voices that continue to dominate nuclear discourse.

Role: principal investigator and sole-author
Status: in draft under advanced contract [2011-21]
Activities: 3x delivered papers
Sponsor/s: Australian Federal Government, Linköping University and the University of Queensland

The manuscript Antipodean Nuclear Politics is under advanced contract to Palgrave MacMillan (c.2020). To date, the following published outputs have arisen from this phase of the project:

  1. N.A.J. Taylor, ‘Is there an ecological path to a nuclear-weapon free world?’. Paper presented at the British International Studies Association Global Nuclear Orders Working Group Conference, Centre for Science and Security Studies, King’s College London, London, England, September 8-9, 2016. [PDF available on request]
  2. N.A.J. Taylor, ‘Explorations in Antipodean Nuclear Thinking: Val Routley/Plumwood and Richard Routley/Sylvan’. Paper presented at The Seed Box: Environmental Humanities Collaboratory and The Posthumanities Hub, Linköping University, Sweden, September 20, 2015. [PDF available on request]
  3. N.A.J. Taylor, ‘The denuclearisation puzzle: Squaring IR theory with the nuclear-weapon-free zone’. Paper presented at the British International Studies Association’s Global Nuclear Order Conference: Power, Challenges and Responses, University of Birmingham, England, September 18, 2015. [PDF available on request]